Exhibit Design & Museum-Related Projects: Huntington Library

Art + Color

Part of Borderlands

Ongoing

Erburu Gallery 13

 

A special exhibit gallery dedicated to the work of artist-in-residence Sandy Rodriguez. Focused on the creation of amate paper and pigments using natural resources and techniques, the gallery also showcases two of Sandy's original artworks. The variety of materials shows the range of colors possible from nature and how colors have moved throughout cultures and countries.

 

All images are © Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens, 2021

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Overall gallery view. Photo by Joshua White

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Overall gallery view through the central case. Photo by Joshua White

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View northeast, showing Sandy's artworks and a reproduction cactus on the window leading out to the garden. A video shows the process of making cochineal red.

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Title wall

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The cactus is actually the source of cohineal, a beetle that, when ground, produces a vibrant red pigment. The installation also includes a family guide.

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The central case displayed various tools used by the artist

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The central case displayed various tools used by the artist

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A large reproduction from the library's print collection illustrates how cochineal beetles are collected and processed.

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A vibrant map shows how different types of red traveled from culture to culture throughout history

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Map points were connected with yarn of the same shade

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The desk delivered a variety of didactic messages, and included an inset case.

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The inset case displayed leaves from Sandy's sketchbook and pigment charts.

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Recipes for different colors are included on the desk for visitors to try at home.

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A display of raw pigments was included in the center of the desk, with their mineral and insect counterparts in specimen jars.

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Backlit paper sample adorned the right side of the desk, each with a magnifying lens to allow the visitors to examine the difference in fibers.